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Link Love

August 10, 2018

 

It's Friday, which means it's time for Link Love, where I share some of my favorite bookish articles and blogs from the past week. There are quite a few links I found interesting and worth sharing this week. I hope you find something here you enjoy. Happy reading!

 

Do you participate in the annual Goodreads Challenge? Then you will know what this article is about. It argues that keeping track of one's reading has taken on a competitive and dissatisfying aura, and that it gives readers the sense they are never reading quite enough. Do you agree? I'm not sure that I do personally, but I read quite a bit and feel that pleasure and entertainment in a book are more important than reading it quickly and moving on to the next one. Reading shouldn't be about competition, it should be a personal and fulfilling experience and if tracking it changes that, stop doing so and just get back to reading what you like, when you like.

Goodreads and the Crushing Weight of Literary FOMO

 

In the vein of that idea, The Guardian discusses why summer is the perfect time for reading whatever you feel like, no guilt allowed!

View on the Joy of Books: Time for Guiltless Pleasures

 

Well-known crime writer Sophie Hannah came to The New York Times' By the Book segment, where she discussed what she is reading, her favorite detectives and villains and much more.

Sophie Hannah: By the Book

 

"We may be living in an anxious nation" is the understatement of the year (or two years...) but it's true enough if new statistics are to be believed. Barnes & Noble claims books about anxiety are flying off the shelves these days, and here they explore the reasons why.

Barnes & Noble Says Sales of Books Related to Anxiety Are Soaring

 

 

True crime as a genre has flourished these past years, but this article from Vulture ponders the reasons behind its rise in popularity and the desire of its watchers/readers/listeners to take on the role of the voyeur. There is an inherent perversity and tragedy in true crime, because it is true, and really one should not find entertainment in it, yet it is a flourishing genre. Do you enjoy True Crime? What do you think about this ethical dilemma?

True Crime's Ethical Dilemma

 

 

 

 

 

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