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Link Love

February 23, 2018

 

 

It's Friday, which means it's time for Link Love, where I share some of my favorite bookish articles and blogs from the past week. Happy reading!

 

Let's start this week off with a bookish quiz, because after lists, quizzes are the best, eren't they? I got Ready Player One, which I cannot say sounds like my cup of tea at all. Might Buzzfeed quizzes be, dare I say it, fallible? When I think back, I have been told I am a 5'2 red-head, would get married this past December and am 82, so...

Which Book Perfectly Matches Your Personality?

 

I found this article really interesting, as it discussed whether we as readers can and should separate what we know about an author from their books. For me this is a struggle. For example, I read about Anne Perry years ago and learned she had been convicted of murdering her friend's mother with her friend when they were teens. I then saw a documentary in which she showed herself cold and even vaguely unrepentant, which made it impossible for me to read her books without thinking of the author. It can be the reverse, too. There are authors who strike me as really likable, lovely people and sometimes I don't even like their books all that much, but feel more generous towards them on the merit of their authors. What do you think?

Should we judge books by their authors?

 

Everyone has their favorite Jane Austen adaptation (or is that only us bookworms?), and the people at Bookriot have rounded them up and decided which takes the prize. I may not agree with all of them, but it's still fun to see all the many variations interpretations this beloved author's books have inspired.

Jane Austen Adaptation Showdown

 

Finally, The Guardian published an interesting study about women's representation in literature from the Victorian era to the present day. The findings are both surprising and intriguing.

Women better represented in Victorian novels than in modern, finds study

 

 

 

 

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